Author Interview – Gary Buller

Gary Buller
Digging deeper into the lives and career of authors…

As promised I’ve done another author interview to highlight and give thanks to the lovely authors that gave me the support and encouragement I needed for my blog to flourish and grow. Hopefully this will give some very well deserved recognition to Gary Buller, an author who gave me a chance and allowed me to start something I’m passionate about, my blog! So without further delay let’s get to know him a little better…

When did you decide to become an author?

Only last year. It came out of the blue to friends and family- even my girlfriend of sixteen years, but was an idea I’d been toying with for a while. I wasn’t very confident initially, but when the story acceptances started to roll in I felt better about my abilities.

Where do you get your story ideas?

I get ideas from things that happen day to day, no matter how mundane. My story ‘Shelf Life’ (Hindered Souls anthology) had origins in supermarket trips with my other half. Pushing the trolley along behind her, bored out of my tree, I wondered what would happen if this experience lasted forever?

Authors are traditionally cast as reclusive loners. Are you?

No, not at all. I’m very sociable but most of all I’d say that I’m a family man. On social media I’m quite cheeky and full of innuendo which I think goes completely against the grain for horror writers. I think some of them balk a little at some of my tweets. I have a good sense of humour and am not easily offended. I find it quite odd when horror writers talk about pushing boundaries in one breath and in the next they’re getting upset over a rude shaped vegetable or something. Writers can take things far too seriously.

Does your writing require research?

Sometimes, especially when it’s about something that I’m not overly familiar with. Google is handy for occasions like that. When I’m writing from experience though I’ll just go with what I know. I have a fairly short attention span when it comes to research, and get bored fairly quickly.

Which authors influence your writing?

I’ve been compared to Stephen King a couple of times which is both flattering and a curse. I think there are too many King wannabes out there. I have read most of his stuff, but don’t intentionally try to ape his style. I do like Joe Hill, Ray Bradbury and Adam Nevill for my horror and speculative fiction fix. I also enjoy the Helen Grace stories by MJ Arlidge.

What part of writing do you find most challenging?

Finding the time is the biggest challenge these days. Also self-editing. It’s one of the reasons why I initially joined a writers workshop and moved on to be part of a writers circle. It’s very difficult to spot faults in your own works.

Do you write the story, or do your characters take over?

The characters always seem to lead the way when I write. They are an extension of me, I suppose, so it makes sense. I’m currently working on some writer-improvement exercises under my Horror Writer Association mentor, Bram Stoker winner Hank Schwaeble, and he’s of the opinion that you have to incorporate at least a little plot development when you sit down to write.

When a reader closes one of your books, what do you hope they’re left with?

I hope that they enjoy it, and want to read more of my stuff. That’s the challenge- to get your name to stand out amongst the thousands and thousands of fledgling writers. If I scare the reader, or give them nightmares then even better.

Do you have any advice for new/ aspiring authors?

Learn that rejection and criticism is not a bad thing. Take that story and work on it some more. Before long you’ll be looking back at drafts of your work from months ago and seeing an improvement. Join an online writer’s group, or circle. Read other aspiring writers work and critique it, then let them do the same to yours.

As a writer, what would you choose as your mascot/spirit animal, why?

My mascot is my six year old daughter, Holly. She’s my inspiration and I love her very much. She has a short piece of flash fiction in my horror collection ‘Mechanisms of Despair’ called ‘Dog of the Dead’ and absolutely delighted in signing the books when they arrived from the printers.

Do you Google yourself?

Occasionally. It’s never anything very interesting though. Just links to my Twitter and Facebook, and the occasional review or Amazon page.

How did you choose the genre you wished to write in?

I think horror chose me. Since the days of secretly watching video nasties when I was too young to do so back in the eighties, I’ve been interested in the macabre. My grandad used to tell a mean ‘true’ ghost story and it used to really freak me out. I’ve attempted writing other stuff but my eyes glaze over just a little. My heart is not in it.

Do you have any new books coming up that you wish to shout about? 

My short story collection ‘Mechanisms of Despair’ is out now and available on ebook and paperback from Amazon. All my proceeds go to Sarcoma UK, a bone and soft tissue cancer charity, and the publishers proceeds go to the Alzheimer’s Foundation in the USA.

I have a short story coming up in a massive horror anthology with a collection of very talented horror writers including John Palisano, Vice President of the horror writers association. It’s called ‘Monsters Exist’ and features cryptids and legendary beasts local to each author. Published by Deadman’s Tome, it should be available June/July time from Amazon and we expect it to do really well.

I would also be amiss if I didn’t mention a project that I’ve been working on with Unnerving Magazine. Hobo Chapbooks will be available in limited editions of 44 from the 5th June 2017. They feature collaborative mashups where horror writers put their slant on other authors works. They are available to pre order here.

Until next time…

If you want to know more about Gary Buller you can have a look on his website for all sorts of updates. Alternatively follow him on Twitter (@garybuller) for regular content!